June 12, 2002
'Massive abuse' of privacy feared

'Massive abuse' of privacy feared "The UK Government this week unveiled a draft list of organisations that will be given the right to request information about the web, telephone and fax lives of British citizens under the controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act."

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Re: 'Massive abuse' of privacy feared

I have been working on a fix, it blocks wireless signals for privacy

Posted by: Stephen on September 30, 2002 06:48 PM

The url is:

http://www.mobilecloak.com

Posted by: Stephen on September 30, 2002 06:49 PM

With all due respect, I see absolutely no value in the above "cloacking" product - if I block my cell phone with a portable Faraday cage, why not just turn it off - it will be equally practical...?

Posted by: andersja on September 30, 2002 07:12 PM

With all due respect, I see absolutely no value in the above "cloacking" product - if I block my cell phone with a portable Faraday cage, why not just turn it off - it will be equally practical...?

Posted by: andersja on September 30, 2002 07:12 PM

> "Your claim above that G3 phones and WiFi equipment cannot be turned off
> puzzles me; have you invented some kind of new power source?"

Mobile / Cell phones / WiFi / 802.11b will all have RFID like tech built in.
They strip the cellular telephone function from the wireless (radio) function.

Enabling Always On, Always Connected (AOAC) Computing with Bluetooth Technology
Designed for use in handheld battery-powered devices, Bluetooth radios have relatively low-power consumption in an active state and even lower consumption in a standby state. The Bluetooth specification does not specify power requirements, but manufacturers are advertising solutions with standby currents of less than 0.3 mA and active data currents no higher than 30 mA at voltages between 3 and 5 V for a maximum power drain of 0.15 W. A typical notebook Li-Ion battery packs 40 W hours of power. If the battery only had to power the radio, this converts into a notebook battery lifetime of 100+ hours of active radio use and months of standby time before the battery is exhausted. Therefore, the Bluetooth radio will not be a significant drain on notebook battery life compared to the rest of the system.
http://www.intel.com/technology/itj/q22000/articles/art_3c.htm

Low-voltage CMOS
http://www.eetimes.com/story/OEG20011221S0028

Nortel Networks to Demonstrate Live, ‘Always On’ Wireless Technologies
http://www.nortelnetworks.com/corporate/news/newsreleases/2002a/03_18_02_ctia_demos.html

Posted by: stephen on October 2, 2002 10:31 PM
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