December 05, 2002
Shoelace-maths

I love it when scientists go out and do something useful... ;-)

New Scientist: Mathematics unravels optimum way of shoe lacing

There are many millions of different possibilities but, reassuringly, the proof shows that centuries of human trial and error has already selected out the strongest lacing patterns.

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"The proofs also ignore certain physical properties, such as the friction exerted by the lace on the eyehole."

I think that's a serious flaw in the research that really diminishes its practical value... But let's put it positively: There is still room for future research! ;-)

Posted by: Martin Roell on December 5, 2002 01:07 PM

I studied physics at university -- maybe I should have stuck to that instead of moving into IT/eBusiness consulting, so I could have explored this important problem further...?

... naaah ...

Posted by: andersja on December 5, 2002 01:13 PM
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The Blog of Harald: Too Much Spare Time? (December 5, 2002 06:52 PM)
"New Scientist reports that Mathematics unravels optimum way of shoe lacing... There are many millions of different possibilities but, reassuringly,"
myBlog by Lars: Shoelace Maths (December 18, 2002 04:03 AM)
"Previously I have commented on a mathematical approach to the tying of neckties. Now NewScientist have released an article on optimal tying of shoelaces. What can one say? People just have too much time! ;)"

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